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Poster: Purple Gel Date: Nov 15, 2013 4:48pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Confession: 35 years after my first show I realize I'm not a Dead Head, but a Jerry fan.

The more I see and hear the various bands and projects of band members, the more I realize that I am not a Deadhead per se, I'm a Jerry Head.

Furthur, Other Ones, The Dead, PL&F, Ratdog, Mickey's projects: Without the genius of Jerry, and the texture he added, they all pretty much leave me cold. I go to see them as an exercise in nostalgia, to see old friends and I love singing along, but I have yet to experience any of the "wow" moments that I did with the Grateful Dead or Jerry Bands. 10-15 minute jams that seem to just meander aimlessly about just don't do it for me and, frankly, I get bored after an hour or so. After the show is over, I never have a desire to listen to it again.

I also realize that my personal assessment of whether a Grateful Dead show was "good" or not was based almost solely on whether I thought Jerry was on. To me Phil was crucial and Billy was very important as well but, while some of Bobby's songs were obviously crucial, I barely noticed his playing most of the time; and I do think that while another good rhythm player would have affected the overall sound of the band, I don't think it would have really affected my enjoyment very much. The Mickey and The Heartbeats shows featuring Crosby and Elvin Bishop are as enjoyable to me as most shows that featured Bobby. As far as keyboards, they were all good players, but again none of them were particularly crucial to my enjoyment. I also loved seeing Jerry with his band as much, if not more, than the Grateful Dead shows I saw.

To me Jerry was, in addition to the lead guitar player, the best rhythm guitar player in the band as well. I always thought that when he played rhythm behind Bobby's attempts at leads and slide guitar (New Minglewood, Red Rooster etc.), Jerry's rhythm was much more interesting than most of Bobby's.

It would have been interesting to see if Jerry could have pulled off being in a trio (Him, Phil/John Kahn and Billy/Ron Tutt), ala Cream or The Who. I think he would have been great in that role, but obviously he always wanted a keyboard player in his electric bands.

The one project that I really enjoyed was seeing 7 Walkers a few years back. They were real good, and more original than any other offshoot I've seen.

So there you have it. I will no longer classify myself as a Dead Head, but as a Jerry fan.

This post was modified by Purple Gel on 2013-11-16 00:48:41

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Poster: Diamondhead Date: Nov 15, 2013 6:20pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 35 years after my first show I realize I'm not a Dead Head, but a Jerry fan.

I don't disagree with your argument at all (I feel much the same way), but I might with your conclusion. They way you described it, you are a Dead Head. My def would be someone who really likes the Dead - ie. Jerry et al in all their synergy (or as Stratocaster put it, the "Greatful Dead Sound"). Jerry really liked to play in that group.

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Poster: grendelschoice Date: Nov 16, 2013 12:24pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 35 years after my first show I realize I'm not a Dead Head, but a Jerry fan.

I was at a show recently that's a regular gig of local musicians who get together and jam to the Dead...the band varies depending on who shows up, but the musicians are always top notch and the jams are heartfelt and energetic.

Whoever takes the Jerry lead is always real good. One could argue that when this person is wailing away they are technically "better" than Jerry was on one of his persian evenings or any gig after 1993.

But what's also true is, as PG said at the top, there is something missing...no matter how good that lead guitarist is...no matter how hard he jams. Jerry had a sound that was like a ringing, beautiful, incomprehensible inner light that shone out through his guitar, and no one's been able to replicate it since, because it's not possible.

It was a lyricism via guitar that was unique, signature. And a thing that was literally once in a lifetime. I too saw The Other Ones, Furthur, Phil & Friends, and have listened to very honorable bands featuring the likes of Steve Kimock, Warren Hayes, and all the usual suspects, but none of these--no matter how spirited the shows actually were--could fill that void left by Jerry.

I know people enjoy going to these shows w/the rest of the band members, and great, have fun...I wish no one any ill will that wants to carry on "the sound." But they're just seeing a knock-off. When they tell me "this was just like a Dead show..really! They were so ON", I just smile and say OK but know that it's not true.

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Poster: Diamondhead Date: Nov 16, 2013 1:05pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 35 years after my first show I realize I'm not a Dead Head, but a Jerry fan.

Bingo. Well put.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Nov 16, 2013 3:31pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 39 years after my first show I realize I've always been a Dead Head, and a CREAM fan.

You know, many have alluded to it above, but the band that makes this even more obvious, to me anyhoo, is....yes....Baker-esque drum roll???

;)

Yes, for me, the DEAD defn have this chemistry issue (it's why I actually disagree w PG; the Hartbeart Shows are just NOT captivating--the long blues jams w Bishop et al. do just the opposite for me--they proved to me as poor as he was/is, and for all my bashing of his vocals, Bob MATTERED!) at center, just as CREAM did.

CREAM, even moreso than the DEAD, is the one band for which I have NO interest, really, in following the individual band members outside of those precious two yrs or so (well, a slight allowance for Blind Faith, EC + SW + WWeeks, but that's IT). I really don't think those three individuals, EC/JB/GB, though clearly the top 1% of their respective positions, ever really captured anything on their own.

For me, I've never really seen the attraction of JGB stuff either...having seen them in the day, during the 70s, at the time I enjoyed Bob's efforts w Kingfish much moreso than any JGB lineup...

Anywayz, put me down in the "whole is greater than the sum of the parts" for both the DEAD, and even more, CREAM.

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Poster: Diamondhead Date: Nov 16, 2013 5:59pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 39 years after my first show I realize I've always been a Dead Head, and a CREAM fan.

"whole is greater than the sum of the parts" for both the DEAD, and even more, CREAM.

Here, here. Great bands are such a fragile, wonderful chemistry. Another - The Beatles. Even the much abused Eagles. Traffic? The list is probably huge.

How about someone putting up names of folks who surpassed their band with their individual efforts?

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Poster: Wichita Clem Date: Nov 17, 2013 4:58pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 39 years after my first show I realize I've always been a Dead Head, and a CREAM fan.

I'm a huge Fairport Convention fan.
That said, Richard Thompson has, in my opinion, at least equaled the group output with his own and probably surpassed it.
His output has continued to be extraordinary. Fairport has had some notable material since his departure and soldiers on as well. Nice he continues to stop by the old neighborhood occasionally as well.

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Poster: Diamondhead Date: Nov 17, 2013 5:33pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 39 years after my first show I realize I've always been a Dead Head, and a CREAM fan.

Good one. Ok, I have one. Where's number two?

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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Nov 17, 2013 6:57pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 39 years after my first show I realize I've always been a Dead Head, and a CREAM fan.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dlk0-HQh2j4

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Poster: Diamondhead Date: Nov 18, 2013 9:35am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 39 years after my first show I realize I've always been a Dead Head, and a CREAM fan.

These are all very nice, but I'm still waiting for no, 2 :)

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Poster: Mandojammer Date: Nov 19, 2013 7:42am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Roxy Music?

Bryan Ferry had some pretty good stuff after Roxy Music.

My daughter was conceived to RM's "Avalon"....that's why it's her middle name.

TMI, I know. You'll all live.

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Poster: TOOTMO Date: Nov 20, 2013 4:18pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

"My daughter was conceived to RM's "Avalon"....that's why it's her middle name."

Heh, heh, heh. My last kid was conceived during a senate filibuster on c-span about 10 years ago. I guess I'm lucky we went with Zoe TOOTMO instead of Dick Shelby TOOTMO—she probably has no idea how lucky she is!

In case you missed yesterday's TDIH, the Playin' is definitely worth backtracking for if you like your Playin' Lesh-filled.

https://archive.org/details/gd1972-11-19.123577.sbd.gans-miller.flac24

Enjoy,
Judge TOOTMO

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Poster: TOOTMO Date: Nov 20, 2013 4:18pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

"My daughter was conceived to RM's "Avalon"....that's why it's her middle name."

Heh, heh, heh. My last kid was conceived during a senate filibuster on c-span about 10 years ago. I guess I'm lucky we went with Zoe TOOTMO instead of Dick Shelby TOOTMO—she probably has no idea how lucky she is!

In case you missed yesterday's TDIH, the Playin' is definitely worth backtracking for if you like your Playin' Lesh-filled.

https://archive.org/details/gd1972-11-19.123577.sbd.gans-miller.flac24

Enjoy,
Judge TOOTMO

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Nov 19, 2013 8:16am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

I dug/dig/grok/whatever his Bryan Ferry Orchestra that does '20's style jazz renditions of tunes (his Dylan covers are also cool).
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A2LhVazAFGY (for you and the mrs.)

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Nov 19, 2013 11:06am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

Skating lightly over my friend Mando's romantic memories, I'd say Brian Peter George St. John le Baptiste de la Salle Eno's career progressed in leaps and bounds post-Roxy.

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Poster: Mandojammer Date: Nov 19, 2013 11:36am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

Hey RTW - good to see you. Hope things are well.

I wasn't going to delve into what happens at home while the various transformations of Pachelbel's Canon on the B side of Discreet Music are playing......

Not to mention his part in the remake of Peter and the Wolf. What an album - my first exposure to Stephane Grapelli. Manfred Mann, Phil Collins, Alvin Lee and Bill Bruford also played. I have some You Tubing to do now......

This post was modified by Mandojammer on 2013-11-19 19:36:27

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Nov 19, 2013 12:39pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

Hey, Rick - things are somewhat divorced from well right now, but knowing things are dandy with you and El Diablo Azul is an undoubted tonic to the spirits. I should spend more time down this loony escape hatch we laughingly call the Grateful Dead Forum. Pachelbel sounds like a good idea, but currently halfway through Cameron Indoor 4-12-78 and bracing myself for that US Blues good-time mind zap.

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Poster: SomeDarkHollow Date: Nov 19, 2013 12:58pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

Speaking of decrepit old Brits (sorry, this includes Scotsman as well), I read this today:

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/20/arts/monty-python-troupe-to-reunite-for-live-shows.html?_r=0

Not to sure this is such a good idea. We've seen some rather sad reuninon tours around this place and I'd hate to see their stellar memory tarnished.

If that US Blues doesn't provide at least some temporary respite, not sure what would.

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Nov 19, 2013 1:05pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

Some things really are best left as happy memories, that's for sure. Meantime, I found out earlier today just what you've been doing to make a buck out of all that furniture you've been trashing in the service of the band.

http://www.reclaimed-pine-furniture.co.uk/pages/about

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Poster: SomeDarkHollow Date: Nov 19, 2013 1:14pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

I wish. I sold the commercial rights to the "SDH" name in order to fund construction of my compound.

Still stings though.




Excellent find, by the way. Good to see that at least some of your time is still occupied by my aura.

(OK, I've left the barn door open, it's up to you what happens next)

This post was modified by SomeDarkHollow on 2013-11-19 21:14:06

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Nov 19, 2013 1:15pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

Still stings, eh? Have you thought of involving the Police?

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Poster: SomeDarkHollow Date: Nov 19, 2013 1:23pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

Nah, I'm afraid Stu might leave splinters.

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Nov 19, 2013 1:30pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

Would he?

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Poster: SomeDarkHollow Date: Nov 20, 2013 4:55am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

Fir sure.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Nov 20, 2013 5:24am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

Aspen?

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Poster: SomeDarkHollow Date: Nov 20, 2013 5:33am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

Hey, don't start barking at me, ash hole.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Nov 20, 2013 6:48am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

Knot me.

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Poster: SomeDarkHollow Date: Nov 20, 2013 6:54am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

Only if you spruce yourself up a bit first.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Nov 20, 2013 7:16am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

Don't make me quince--you're evergreen with envy...

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Poster: SomeDarkHollow Date: Nov 20, 2013 8:06am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

http://video.wikia.com/wiki/File:The_Money_Pit_-_Weak_Trees (35:32 mark)

Wonder what you'll birch about next...

This post was modified by SomeDarkHollow on 2013-11-20 16:06:41

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Poster: unclejohn52 Date: Nov 20, 2013 9:19am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

I'd say someone has those deep elm blues....

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Nov 20, 2013 9:46am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

Come on, guys - this is the wrong time of year for the saps to be rising,

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Poster: SomeDarkHollow Date: Nov 20, 2013 9:50am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

"Her song is the larch on the morning's door"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ug8nHaelWtc

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Nov 20, 2013 9:58am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

Induces inescapable feelings of euphorbia.

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Poster: SomeDarkHollow Date: Nov 20, 2013 10:00am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

And why wood it knot?

(I know, they've been used, but I couldn't resist it. That's the only resin I have.)

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Nov 20, 2013 10:06am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

So you didn't feel like branching out, that's oak-a.

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Poster: SomeDarkHollow Date: Nov 20, 2013 10:09am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

Nope, I'm deeply rooted where I am.


(I was going to go with a redwood or petrified wood reference, but realized that could be a little too lowbrow, even for me)

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Nov 20, 2013 10:16am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

Thanks. I'm actually grateful not to see your wood for the trees.

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Poster: SomeDarkHollow Date: Nov 20, 2013 10:24am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

OK, that's it. I bough to your superior intellect.




(tell me you haven't missed these intellectually stimulating exchanges)

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Nov 20, 2013 10:31am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

Speaking of Tell, do you think if we cut him in half and counted the rings we could find out how old he really is?

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Poster: SomeDarkHollow Date: Nov 20, 2013 10:33am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

I'm afrad the dry rot has done too much damage.

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Nov 20, 2013 10:47am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

Could we rub some Cream on it?

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Poster: SomeDarkHollow Date: Nov 20, 2013 10:54am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

I think it best if I leaf that one where it is.

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Nov 20, 2013 11:01am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

Well a (leaf) litter goes a long way.



(Slow day in the workplace, old friend?)

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Poster: SomeDarkHollow Date: Nov 20, 2013 11:07am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

Does it show?

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Nov 20, 2013 11:12am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

I kind of wish Dire would show up, but maybe that's just pining for the old days...

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Poster: SomeDarkHollow Date: Nov 20, 2013 11:17am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

I also miss that lumbering oaf.

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Nov 20, 2013 11:23am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

He was always really good at twigging what was going on.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Nov 20, 2013 1:10pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

That stick-fetching, canid scent-gland bearing, bark-slobbering woofer?

Yeah, if there's someone that knows what to do with a trunk, he'd be our "man"...ahem.

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Nov 19, 2013 11:18am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

Yep. Then again, is being known as the father of ambient music always a good thing? He just released a new album:
http://warp.net/records/brian-eno/new-album-lux-announced/

I'll always love him for his work on the Bowie Berlin trilogy
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6IJsAuUgSgc

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Poster: Mandojammer Date: Nov 19, 2013 10:32am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

The girl who did the solo on the studio version of Avalon was named Fonzie Thornton.

Hands down, if you are a female vocalist named Fonzie, you make the list.

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Poster: TOOTMO Date: Nov 20, 2013 4:18pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

"My daughter was conceived to RM's "Avalon"....that's why it's her middle name."

Heh, heh, heh. My last kid was conceived during a senate filibuster on c-span about 10 years ago. I guess I'm lucky we went with Zoe TOOTMO instead of Dick Shelby TOOTMO—she probably has no idea how lucky she is!

In case you missed yesterday's TDIH, the Playin' is definitely worth backtracking for if you like your Playin' Lesh-filled.

https://archive.org/details/gd1972-11-19.123577.sbd.gans-miller.flac24

Enjoy,
Judge TOOTMO

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Poster: TOOTMO Date: Nov 20, 2013 4:18pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

"My daughter was conceived to RM's "Avalon"....that's why it's her middle name."

Heh, heh, heh. My last kid was conceived during a senate filibuster on c-span about 10 years ago. I guess I'm lucky we went with Zoe TOOTMO instead of Dick Shelby TOOTMO—she probably has no idea how lucky she is!

In case you missed yesterday's TDIH, the Playin' is definitely worth backtracking for if you like your Playin' Lesh-filled.

https://archive.org/details/gd1972-11-19.123577.sbd.gans-miller.flac24

Enjoy,
Judge TOOTMO

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Poster: TOOTMO Date: Nov 21, 2013 3:54pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Roxy Music?

For those who care, I only have one daughter named "Zoe", not four as my posts would indicate. (Was that Foreman who named a coupla kids "George"?)

Enjoy,
Judge TOOTMO

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Poster: William Tell Date: Nov 18, 2013 10:20am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 39 years after my first show I realize I've always been a Dead Head, and a CREAM fan.

Hey DH, yeah, I have a tough time w it as well; it's party my "early IS always better" bias, ya know?

But, we can at least point to some bands, of which these stars alluded to above were members, that were NOT great, they left, only to become GREAT in the next one?

Like Baker and Bruce and Clapton, ea in various "formative" groups prior to CREAM; or even YOUR Stevie in SDG, but much more in TRAFFIC, eh?

Nonetheless, to your org query? I got almost NUTHIN.

Was Sting considered more solo than w the Police? I think not, but others might?

Dave Mason, out from under all the others, was more successful solo than w Traffic? Perhaps?

Anyhoo, this is HARD, thus proving your pt.

;)

Whoops; what about CSN&Y? An exception as a rare super group get together for a brief period? Of course, I think all of them declined hugely post 72, though NY at least keeps things interesting, as does Crosby the mirror image of Linda Ronstadt BMI wise, ahem...but I think not.


This post was modified by William Tell on 2013-11-18 18:20:51

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Poster: Diamondhead Date: Nov 18, 2013 11:25am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 39 years after my first show I realize I've always been a Dead Head, and a CREAM fan.

"even YOUR Stevie in SDG,"

Hah, in SDG Stevie was a hired gun - nothing more. And SD resented him anyway.

"Dave Mason, out from under all the others, was more successful solo than w Traffic? Perhaps?"

Imo, no. His first solo record was terrific and I still play it regularly. But his following stuff never quite made it to that level save for some sporadic pop success. And I saw him a couple of times in LA - I loved the sound of his guitar playing. But if I look at the body of music that Traffic created compared to his, then no.

And CSNY? I never really considered them a real group. The Y was a grudging and not fully committed participant.

I guess I'm not saying that individuals coming out of groups didn't make some terrific stuff (I'll admit to loving Don Henley's solo stuff), but overall, there is nothing like the synergy and magic that sometimes happens within groups. Guess that's why I like basketball too.

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Poster: grendelschoice Date: Nov 18, 2013 12:03pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 39 years after my first show I realize I've always been a Dead Head, and a CREAM fan.

Well, Sonny couldn't carry on w/out Cher...altho' The Captain surely didn't need Tenielle. I always thought Danny Partridge should have gone solo while he still had his chops, but....


Sorry, I've clearly lost the thread here. John Fogerty w/out CCR? Does anyone remember who the other band members of CCR were? No, but Fogerty still needed them for his best stuff.
Robbie Robertson did fine solo work w/out The Band, but, c'mon...his true worth still came from THE BAND.

Maybe the better question is: could guys who made their careers solo have made it just as significantly w/a great band around them? Dylan may answer that question. He had some OK moments with the Dead, but overall? Not even a contest. And don;t get me started on the Traveling Willburys.

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Poster: wlg3 Date: Nov 18, 2013 12:44pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 39 years after my first show I realize I've always been a Dead Head, and a CREAM fan.

Here's one for your better question: Did Rod Stewart need The Faces in the early 70s to propel him to stardom on the late 70s and onward, or might he have eventually gotten there anyway?

(Note: I personally ignore post-Faces Rod, and half the time ignore Faces Rod to concentrate on Woody, Plonk, Mac & Kenney.)

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Poster: Diamondhead Date: Nov 18, 2013 1:36pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 39 years after my first show I realize I've always been a Dead Head, and a CREAM fan.

Good point. I think some guys were 'just passing through' on their way to their destinies.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Nov 18, 2013 1:14pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 39 years after my first show I realize I've always been a Dead Head, and a CREAM fan.

Oh, well, whatever your view, I think you just nailed it: RS defn was HUGE following the 60s, and thus had a much better solo career; in fact, I bet only a few people would actually go along w you/me/any? as to Faces having been "gestalt great" or whatever...ie, most would view he was just slowly maturing, and bingo, nails it.

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Nov 18, 2013 10:18am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 39 years after my first show I realize I've always been a Dead Head, and a CREAM fan.

An argument could be made for Sting, not that I will make it, just on the basis of his work with Branford, Kenny Kirkland, etc for "Bring on the Night". He played with Gil Evans Orchestra with that band and did full on miles show. I enjoyed that stuff more than the police. However, that's due to the others, not so much him.

A good argument could be made for Lou Reed, but he never really totally left behind VU material, and returned to it. But the bulk of his solo work measures well.

Can you count jazz musicians that left ensembles to form own bands? If so, then you could go on forever re Bird, Monk, Trane, Miles...

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Poster: Diamondhead Date: Nov 18, 2013 11:37am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 39 years after my first show I realize I've always been a Dead Head, and a CREAM fan.

Hey I just thought of one - everyone's fav around here. :)

Nysnc > Justin Timberlake

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Nov 18, 2013 12:00pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 39 years after my first show I realize I've always been a Dead Head, and a CREAM fan.

too soon to call - isn't the jury still out on this one? :)

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Poster: Diamondhead Date: Nov 18, 2013 1:34pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 39 years after my first show I realize I've always been a Dead Head, and a CREAM fan.

Maybe. Didn't he give them 42 seconds in their reunion at the recent MTV awards?

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Poster: Diamondhead Date: Nov 18, 2013 11:21am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 39 years after my first show I realize I've always been a Dead Head, and a CREAM fan.

I could accept a Sting argument, but the Police catalog is pretty indelible.

Much as I seem to different from folks around here, I never really connected to Lou Reed. Maybe it was the LA - NY thing.

And as for jazz, I am seriously lacking in the historical knowledge to argue anything. I went through a phase in my early 20s but I think I'll stick to rock and r&b and country.

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Poster: SomeDarkHollow Date: Nov 18, 2013 11:34am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 39 years after my first show I realize I've always been a Dead Head, and a CREAM fan.

I'm with you on Lou. Just never did it for me.


Now don't get me started on the whole Davy Jones solo/Monkees thing.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Nov 18, 2013 10:28am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 39 years after my first show I realize I've always been a Dead Head, and a CREAM fan.

I do think in "our" domain that your guy, Rob's too, is the ONE good example, though I've never caught the popular RT disease personally.

;)

EDIT!!!!

Amazing! I saw your lead comment on Sting, and thought you'd said that repling to ME, but realize we independently wrote those comments...

Do do do-do, DO do do-do (sorry, that's supposed to be TZone theme...?)

This post was modified by William Tell on 2013-11-18 18:28:03

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Poster: ColdRain108 Date: Nov 18, 2013 1:11pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 39 years after my first show I realize I've always been a Dead Head, and a CREAM fan.

Peter Gabriel vs Genesis?

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Poster: Diamondhead Date: Nov 18, 2013 2:57pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 39 years after my first show I realize I've always been a Dead Head, and a CREAM fan.

Good one. I have So. Did he do a lot after that? I'm not up on him.

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Nov 18, 2013 3:06pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 39 years after my first show I realize I've always been a Dead Head, and a CREAM fan.

OOH! I think we found another.

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Poster: Diamondhead Date: Nov 18, 2013 4:47pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 39 years after my first show I realize I've always been a Dead Head, and a CREAM fan.

Hey, right now this is more fun than talking about Further.

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Nov 17, 2013 5:14pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 39 years after my first show I realize I've always been a Dead Head, and a CREAM fan.

DITTO!

This should prove interesting ...
http://dmme.net/yusuf-islam-ropes-in-rick-rubin-and-richard-thompson/



For a fall sunday evening ...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HqViJyweNV0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U3DS6xglAfQ

This post was modified by bluedevil on 2013-11-18 01:14:49

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Nov 18, 2013 10:17am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 39 years after my first show I realize I've always been a Dead Head, and a CREAM fan.

I'm always posting, ad nauseum for many, about RT. I've also been seeing him on regular basis since mid-80's (I guess it was Rumor & Sigh; Tony Levin was in the band). Anyway, he's up there with my very favorites all time. The solo in Hard on Me...

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Poster: Wichita Clem Date: Nov 18, 2013 10:08am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 39 years after my first show I realize I've always been a Dead Head, and a CREAM fan.

Thanks for the tasty links!!
I'm lucky to have been able to see him most every year since the late '80s. Sometimes electric, sometimes not, but always wonderful.
A troubador in the classic sense!

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Nov 16, 2013 3:44pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 39 years after my first show I realize I've always been a Dead Head, and a CREAM fan.

tell (is) the truth

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3bOAsPIKeJY

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Poster: Kate. Date: Nov 17, 2013 5:28am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 39 years after my first show I realize I've always been a Dead Head, and a CREAM fan.

WT: Morrisey and Marr with The Smiths and Gilmour and Waters during their incarnation of Floyd are rather obvious examples of the Rock Gestalt phenomenon - though all registered some impressive individual work (or, in the case of DG, continued releases with a version of the former band)./K

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Poster: GibsonES335 Date: Nov 15, 2013 5:09pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 35 years after my first show I realize I'm not a Dead Head, but a Jerry fan.

cheers

Attachment: ark-_38305_g40p0z0s_is_1.jpeg
Attachment: jerrygoldengatepark1975lj6.jpg
Attachment: 0912000034-l.jpg

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Poster: BornEasement Date: Nov 15, 2013 5:43pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 35 years after my first show I realize I'm not a Dead Head, but a Jerry fan.

said bobbys guitar

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Poster: Pig Street ! Date: Nov 16, 2013 9:06am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 35 years after my first show I realize I'm not a Dead Head, but a Jerry fan.

Right on i it! My buddy just recently sent me a link to 7 Walkers shows and videos. I have to say they take the cake as far as ANY post Grateful Dead configuration Show! Their arrangements of Dead songs are beautiful , a great mix of New Orleans funk and soul.The updated quality of past Dead shows have kept me entertained since Jer's passing, The Dead thing never appeased me

I saw P&F with Ratdog in 2002', I couldn't stomach Warren and felt Bobby was washed up at that point.Since then i steered clear of the Fantasy -Looking sets that Phil has produced or any other and former Dead member related shows. Although decent musicianship, the arrangements seem plastic to me.
That is until very recently, like as in yesterday prior to your original posting I received that 7 Walkers link........Nice


Miss ya Jer! 7 Walkers give me afresh sample of tunes!

Jerry Fan, but an Ole Grateful Dead Fan Forever!

This post was modified by Pig Street ! on 2013-11-16 17:06:51

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Poster: Monte B Cowboy Date: Nov 16, 2013 11:45am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 40 years after my first show I realize they played everything except Bob Wills

If I'm not mistaken, it seems to me the only thing missing from GD's musical grab-bag is "country swing" influences. No doubt about it, they had their jazz influences. Dec 18, 1973 was so jazzy-sounding that I matrixed the damned thing. (Eyes of The World!) But GD didn't play any swing, or am I missing something?

Western Swing is fun music! It's my fav Cowboy music. Bob Wills music is tantilizing and exciting. So is the Grateful Dead. They both played cowboy tunes that I liked, and I loved it because they played them so well; they both had extra players to make that big, fat, live sound; both bands emphasized excellent instrument-playing skills and attractive arrangements; both bands combined numerous popular music themes - from the same genres - into their playing styles, playing acoustic and electric instruments. Lots of famous and not-so-famous bands and musicians have performed their material for years and decades.

Buddy Emmons was among the most notable pedal-steel players in the '70s. Who knew he could sing? He's a famous Nashville sideman who played steel on scores (probably hundreds) of albums. Recently I was having flashbacks of Bob Wills cowboy swing tunes playing non-stop inside my head. It wouldn't stop playing. I kept hearing Buddy singing it. Finally, I transferred the two best Cowboy Swing LPs I have, from my cassettes to digital, and put them on my iPod.

Buddy Emmons Sings Bob Wills (FF-017), and Hillbilly Jazz (FF-101), came out on Flying Fish Records in the 1970s. I recall Flying Fish being a spin-off from Rounder Records. I recommend purchasing these albums. My links include snippets for each track.

I already transferred and shared my Hillbilly Jazz tapes with Vassar Clements and Doug Jernigan playing. They didn't play everything from their Hillbilly Jazz album at these two gigs, and, they also played some tunes at these gigs that weren't on the album. Vassar's web site explains this music:
Hillbilly Jazz is an amalgam of the diverse influences that have touched Vassar throughout his career, but it's particularly a composite of his country background and his affinity for the jazz and swing music of his youth. Early in his career, Vassar learned Bluegrass and country styles while working with the like of Bill Monroe, et al., but he's also gained respect as a jazz player. His duet album with the legendary jazz fiddler Stephane Grappelli, "Together At Last" led to his fifth grammy nomination.

Vassar says, "actually I heard more swing than country or bluegrass while I was growing up in Florida. I've always loved that kind of rhythm." Back then he was just a young fiddler, naively interpreting on his instrument the sounds he was hearing his Big Band idols play.

"I used to sit in with combos in Florida, and I even won dance contests during the Big Band era. I was playing jazz along with them, but at this time, I had never heard of Stephane Grappelli, Joe Venutti or any of those great guys. Neither had I ever heard much western swing by Bob Wills. Somehow, I think the swing style, subconsciously has always come through in almost everything I've played."

Vassar has always been open-minded to new ideas and seemingly has been able to find common musical and philosophical bonds with anyone from the diversified roster of Artists who have enlisted his talents. He always seems emotionally caught up in his performances. As his bow glides effortlessly across the strings, his eyes closed, head cocked and a pensive expression on his face, it's as if he is lost in another world.

Hillbilly Jazz is an uninhibited and unabashed expression of Vassar's open-minded approach to music, people and life in general. In the true tradition of all the great musical stylists, Vassar has rejected the straitjacket of labeling. This has resulted in a natural blend of the creative freedom in jazz and the to the point honesty of country. He performs with the depth of someone who has lived a lot and as if his soul has been prepared to play his Hillbilly Jazz.

Instrumentally, Vassar boldly blazes a trail for his band. His fiddle solos soar and glide gently over the rhythm in a manner reminiscent of saxophonist Lester Young's work with the Count Basie Band decades ago. But what perhaps surprises even Vassar's most ardent admirers is his vocals, another definite statement of his affection for cultural roots and family ties.

But just as Bill Monroe is to bluegrass, Elvis Presley to rock and roll, and Bob Wills was to Western Swing, so will and should be Vassar Clements to the field of Hillbilly Jazz.

There may be many imitators, but Vassar Clements will always remain the king of Hillbilly Jazz.

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Poster: boxcaro Date: Feb 17, 2014 11:59am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 40 years after my first show I realize they played everything except Bob Wills

Have you heard "MINORS ALOUD" Buddy Emmons With Lenny Breau?

I bouht he CD from ART OF LIFE RECORDS, LLC , a while back, blew me away! (Yes, I Meant To Pun!)

I Loved Lenny, although I was told about him after he died. Who could NOT love such a Tangle as Lenny & Buddy?

Also , I took Broadcast Schooling in 1974 iin Arkansas, got the First Class Radiotelephone License, NO Texas Calculater! We Used SLIDE RUELS.

God, my Eyes Hurt, can't type.

CALL SIGN...W5AWG....Johnny_Jazz

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Poster: Monte B Cowboy Date: Feb 17, 2014 5:14pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 40 years after my first show I realize they played everything except Bob Wills

I used slide rules in my electronics and broadcasting classes in '73 and '74 too. They were fast, you had to think on your toes, and they worked great. No batteries required!

I remember when those Texas Instruments calculators first came out. They were expensive. Only a few kids in my class had them. My slide rule worked just as good.

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Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Nov 16, 2013 12:36pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 40 years after my first show I realize they played everything except Bob Wills

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9TnP_NRLzlc

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Poster: Monte B Cowboy Date: Nov 17, 2013 9:07am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 40 years after my first show I realize they played everything except Bob Wills

That's a Very Good example! Asleep At The Wheel have been around a long time. Bob Wills is The King of Western Swing!

I'm standing my ground on The Cowboy issue, regardless. Didn't Jerry learn how to play music primarily on a banjo? Didn't Jerry play Cowboy tunes on pedal steel? What about bluegrass? Jerry played bluegrass with everyone at the Marin County Bluegrass Festival in 1974.

I converted to Cowboy in 1973. My neighborhood produced some very good musicians. Al Di Meola is one of them. We had numerous musicians and bands from my area that were very good. Among them, we had a clone GD band, a clone Hot Tuna band - with much better violin playing than Papa John Creach (screach), and a John Cipollina clone. I hung out with all of them, except for Di Meola, whom I did not know.

Van Manakas was John Cipollina. John Zias was Jerry Garcia. Eric Levine was a much, much better violin player than Papa John Creach. Eric and Van also played in the Stoney Creek bluegrass band in late '73 and early '74.

At one point in 1973, we had Manakas doing Cipollina, and Zias doing Garcia, playing together in the same band - VERY remarkable! That band was named Hell's Half Acre, after this very bizarre spot nearby Casper, Wyoming. Van was the biggest Cowboy in our bunch at this time, and he had this "thing" for Wyoming, big time! I was at every gig that Hell's Half Acre ever played.

Re: GD are Cowboys!

Is this a cultural issue, scene issue, and/or musical issue? Is it p-c anymore to digress into the Cowboy issue - beyond just "purely musical interests"? David Lemieux's comments about Europe '72 were very interesting. He hits a home run when he describes how you could really hear GD's country influence in 1972. But Lemieux doesn't "run the bases" because he doesn't go into the details.

If GD's Cowboy influence is purely about the music, then please explain "why" they were dressing, acting, playing around, and looking like Cowboys during the early years? WtF? Give me a fucking break! (lol) Jerry breaks a rib after falling off a horse at Mickey's ranch while the band was hired to play a band of horse-riding musicians in a film. Cowboy underpinnings do not get any more straight-forward than this, sorry gang.

By 1972, 1973, and 1974 the cowboy music influences (country rock, bluegrass, western swing) were hitting "the scene" in droves! At the 1973 shows I went to, I witnessed GD on stage wearing cowboy shirts and blue jeans most of the time. Today we have tons of images, film, and video tape documenting GD being cowboys. It wasn't just GD being cowboys back then. It was everywhere. Bunches of us wore western-wear clothing at the time. To honor our favorite bands and artists, we were wearing cowboy boots, jeans, and cowboy shirts. You couldn't easily buy western-wear clothing in the NJ-NYC metro area at this time. It was very hard to find. There was an Army-Navy Surplus store in Hackensack (Dawg's home town) that had some cowboy western-wear, and that was it. I had to go there many times before I found a few good cowboy shirts and boots that I liked. Truck Stops sometimes had cowboy clothing, but I had to drive a long ways to find any good stuff.

How did I wind up becoming a cowboy-soundman for the best Kentucky bluegrass band in Louisville in the mid-1970s? I reserve the right to hold back my story, rather than blogging here. It's a hippie-freak-cowboy story I'm willing to tell Ken Burns or David Lemieux. But I'll touch base on the Lazy River band story.
The Lazy River band was based in Louisville, KY in 1976. The original band members play on this tape: John Jump, Robert Pool, Vince Gill, Bill Millet, and Bob Briedenbach. Vince Gill and John Jump were the frontmen. Vince was the main lead vocalist. He played electric mandolin, fiddle, and accoustic & electric guitars. John Jump sang lead vocals, wrote original songs, and played guitars. Lazy River band's soul, energy, creativity, and charisma were built around this powerful duo. The diversity of Lazy River's songs depicts the many influences that the band had adopted as its own: bluegrass, newgrass, western swing, Hank Williams, country rock, Grateful Dead, and jazz... and a Hippie Soundman.

All the Lazy River band artists were formerly members of the Bluegrass Alliance band at the same time, with Lonnie Peerce. They all left this band together when they formed the Lazy River band in 1976. Similarly, Sam Bush and founding members of the Newgrass Revival band were also members of the Bluegrass Alliance band together in 1971, with Lonnie Peerce. Sam and the other artists all left the Alliance together when they formed the Newgrass Revival band. It shold be noted that Tony Rice and Dan Crary were former members of Bluegrass Alliance. We have a YouTube clip of Bluegrass Alliance with Tony Rice and Sam Bush shown as members of this band in 1971.

I was soundman for the Bluegrass Alliance in 1975 & 1976. Numerous band members and me were roommates together at Harry Bickel's place. It was a musical jamming house in Louisville. I also worked as a videotape operator at a TV station in Louisville. When the Lazy River band formed up, they asked me to quit my full-time job at the TV station to become their soundman full-time. That's when I became the Lazy River soundman full-time. Then I designed and built some custom-made wiring assemblies and several stage boxes for the PA system and the monitors. I invested my life savings and purchased a sound mixer and some PA amplifiers. I already had some studio quality Electro-Voice mics and a pair of Bose speaker arrays that the band used. Besides being a Hippie, I was also a very successful live music taper. My taping follies and sound system skills all began with me taping Grateful Dead shows in 1973. This is how the Lazy River sound system was born.

Almost immediately, Robert Pool quit his bassist job with Lazy River. He moved back to Austin. The band was putting together their promo kit for getting gigs. They made another appointment with their photographer to get their new bassist in their photo spread. The new bassist, John Bieser, was still in St. Louis. The band almost convinced me to pose with them in a new photo, even though I was just the soundman. After an argument about this, I smoked a bunch of dope, and then I ran off to my girlfriend's place. That left Lazy River no choice but to use their original photo. John Bieser plays bass on these tapes, but Robert Pool is shown in their photo.

A couple of months later Vince Gill and John Jump left Lazy River band at the same time. This was the beginning of the end of the band. It never really got going. We never had enough paying gigs to keep everyone interested. New band members Eric Weber, Frank Heyer, Pat O'Conner, and Bruce Cromer joined the band. Now the band had 8 members and a soundman. We have them recorded on my tapes playing bluegrass, swing and jazz music with violin and guitar virtuoso Mark O'Connor, at age 15, on one of their tapes. The gypsy mode was taking hold. A few months later it was over.
The point is, all these great Cowboy players had similar patterns of music-playing evolution: bluegrass > hip bluegrass > newgrass > swing > jazz. But not Jerry and The Grateful Dead.

Somewhere, somehow, GD skipped around the swing part. They never played any swing, correct? They advanced directly to jazzy stuff while they kept on playing their Cowboy tunes. No other "jazzy Cowboy band" ever did this that I am aware. Didn't all of Jerry's and GD's cowboy-sidemen and cowboy-cohorts play 'some swing music' first, before they played jazzier styles? All musicians and bands, except GD, go through the swing phase first, before advancing to their jazzy stuff. (Needs to be carefully fact-checked.) It only took me six years to explain this.

Jer is saying, "We've always been Cowboys, man."
19700420_0397.jpg

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Poster: Wichita Clem Date: Nov 18, 2013 10:13am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 40 years after my first show I realize they played everything except Bob Wills

Thank you Monte!!
Followed your links to not only the live Vassar you upped, but also to the Zias and Manakas material as well.
I'd have never found those without your post here.
You said the magic word: Cipollina. So long after his passing and he remains one of my very favorite players.

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Poster: englishrose Date: Nov 20, 2013 2:51pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 40 years after my first show I realize they played everything except Bob Wills

me too

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Poster: cd bodhi Date: Nov 17, 2013 3:46pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 40 years after my first show I realize they played everything except Bob Wills

Hey Monte, doesn't this count?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aUmV-2NUFoM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5sS5jSbV0Vg

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QH8xt6_ZSBg
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=neTbR1s7lF4

No? How 'bout this swinging set including Rosalie McF, Tell it to Me, Cold Jordan and especially Swing Low? Just insert your own Ahhh-ha's :)

https://archive.org/details/gd70-08-05.sbd.jupile.17271.sbeok.shnf



This post was modified by cd bodhi on 2013-11-17 23:46:49

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Poster: Monte B Cowboy Date: Dec 6, 2013 1:28pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 40 years after my first show I realize they played everything except Bob Wills

Thank you, sir! That Aug 5, 1970 cowboy set by GD is timeless! Whoa sweet mama, daddy's got them Deep Elem Blues is beautiful. Dark Hollow is played after that, then FOTD. Thank you, again!

I love their electric versions of El Paso, Big River, Cumberland Blues, Me and My Uncle, Mexicali Blues, The Race Is On. But I love GD for tunes like Sugaree, Deal, Sugar Magnolia, Lovelight, Dark Star, China Cat > Rider, NFA > GDTRFB, and on and on... It's a long list of material. They were the best performing band I ever saw, the best sounding by far, playing the best setlists, and they played longer shows than anyone else. Nothing else like it! GD had the most "drive". They had the best-sounding dynamic range. They improvised and jammed better than any Rock band in history.

Three years ago I brought up "the Cowboy issue" with these five versions of Sitting On Top Of The World, all linked to Grateful Dead and Bluegrass Alliance. I've added Dark Hollow, Me And My Uncle, and Friend Of The Devil for ya'll.

"Drive that train!"

GratefulDead_Logo_sm.jpg

Sittin' On Top of The World

Hillbillies or Cowboys, sometimes called Cowpokes - take your pick - a.k.a. "the Pokes"

Sittin' On Top of The World — mp3, 3:23, Jerry Garcia lead vocals, March 29, 1968
Source: unknown Audience — one of the earliest AUD recordings of this tune on The Archive
"an outstanding audience recording that is often mistaken for a soundboard"

196609xx_0117.jpg

After the applause, a GD cowboy says "Well, we never did that one very good even when we were doing it."

Next track is Dark Star, mp3, 7:30. Only a Grateful Dead cowboy band would play these 2 songs back-to-back.

Sittin' On Top of The World

performed by other "Cowboy" & "Hillbilly" bands:

Bluegrass Alliance Sept 23,1975 SBD
1-Thumb-Bluegrass-Alliance.jpg
Sittin' On Top of The World - mp3, 4:08, Vince Gill lead vocals
Dark Hollow - mp3, 4:32, Vince Gill lead vocals
mixed & taped by me

Newgrass Revival Sept 28, 1975 SBD
1-Thumb-NGR.jpg
Sittin' On Top of The World - mp3, 3:10, Sam Bush lead vocals
Me And My Uncle - mp3, 3:41, Curtis Burch lead vocals
mixed by Hazel Johnson & taped by me

Lazy River Aug 1976 SBD
1-Thumb-lazy-river.jpg
Sittin' On Top of The World - mp3, 4:57
Vince Gill lead vocals, fiddle, electric mandolin
this is my favorite arrangement! - mixed & taped by me

Lazy River w/ 15-year-old Mark O'Connor Oct, 1976 SBD
1-Thumb-mark.jpg
Sittin' On Top of The World - mp3, 7:51, Eric Weber lead vocals
Friend of The Devil > Blackberry Blossom - mp3, 16:30, Eric Weber lead vocals
mixed & taped by me - check these acid-grass tunes out!


This post was modified by Monte B Cowboy on 2013-12-06 21:28:44

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Poster: snoori Date: Nov 16, 2013 8:13am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 35 years after my first show I realize I'm not a Dead Head, but a Jerry fan.

That's a very honest appraisal of your musical reflections on our favourite band PG. The reason I am a GD fan over a JGB fan remains the same from wayback which is the chemistry and heights that they reached as they explored the outer reaches that musicians aspire to.

I admit that they did this best in the later years of the 1960s, but there was always enough to keep me hooked up to the 1981 autumn European tour.

I love JGB but I've always seen that as an outlet for Jerry to free himself of the need to come up with the 'spacier side' every evening, but settle into a groove and enjoy a more relaxed evening playing in a defined style.

One reason you may be getting bored after an hour or so is that no-one plays like that any more and you have become used to seeing new bands. Maybe we were the last audiences that could just lay back and let the musicians take us on a journey, and in the modern world post GD projects no longer match up.

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Poster: stratocaster Date: Nov 15, 2013 4:58pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 35 years after my first show I realize I'm not a Dead Head, but a Jerry fan.

I agree with some of that and Ive also ignored post 95 band member projects, but I love the "Grateful Dead Sound" that is achieved by the band when they are cooking in their prime, I love Garcia Band, but it's too many covers and I admit to not being too crazy about some of his own material (Cats)...there's nothing he plays in JGB that is better than Scarlet Begonias or China Cat or Dew (as a cover)...the parallel songs like TLEO or Sugaree I go for Dead over JGB....with Weir, despite his flaws, I listen to a show like 05-02-1970 and there he is playing those perfect fills in Other One and in Rider, etc.

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Poster: RBNW....new and improved! Date: Nov 16, 2013 3:48am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 35 years after my first show I realize I'm not a Dead Head, but a Jerry fan.

those flaws are what made bob perfect!

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Poster: Dudley Dead Date: Nov 16, 2013 8:54am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Confession: 35 years after my first show I realize I'm not a Dead Head, but a Jerry fan.

Agree on the post Jerry bands . Some of it is good, but the magic is just not there . I like Garcia's outside of the Dead projects, but still with their faults, there was something special with that musical dance between, Jerry, Phil, and Bob . Nothing like it . Weir is an underrated musician, but a perplexing one . How could someone be such a subtle, and original guitar player (NOT his slide solos), gaff so much in the taste department, in song choice, and singing ( he can be an effective singer, but he often doesn't help himself, with some of his attempts to be Howling Wolf , or Dylan, or his song defeating histrionics). Want to hear Garcai in a power trio ? The Hartbeat shows from 68 . But, as we have blabbed about some earlier time, they just feel instrumentally to be missing something (and vocals of course).
But, as great as Lesh, and Weir are, Garcia was the keystone of the arch . And yes, he is the reason I love the Dead .